Archive for the ‘ Healthcare ’ Category

Managing Parkinson’s disease

Monday, April 12th, 2021

Finding simple daily tasks like making breakfast, going to answer the phone, getting a glass of water, writing a shopping list exhausting? This may be due to Parkinson’s disease. You may look good, but you may feel entirely different from the way you look. Parkinson’s exhaustion makes it difficult to move, as though you don’t have any energy left. You may also suffer from a debilitating mental exhaustion, sometimes called Parkinson’s apathy, which impairs focus and makes it difficult to begin a task, follow directions or recall information.

Don’t give up!Parkinson’s disease is a type of movement disorder that affects the nervous system and is a chronic and progressive disease. As per statistics, India has 7 million elders afflicted with Parkinson’s disease. Early diagnosis, timely intervention and treatment that includes medication and surgery helps manage this disease and control its progression.

Symptoms of Parkinson’s disease

Many people mistaken Parkinson symptoms for normal signs of aging and may ignore them. However any early signs of Parkinson’s disease must be discussed with a doctor. Here are a few signs and symptoms that need attention:

  • Movement: There may be a tremor in the hands
  • Coordination: A reduced sense of coordination and balance may lead to falls and dropping of items held
  • Gait: The person’s posture may change and they may lean forward
  • Facial expression: This can become fixed
  • Voice: There may be a tremor in the voice, or the person may speak more softly
  • Handwriting: This may become more cramped and smaller
  • Sense of smell: A loss of sense of smell can be an early sign

Mood changes, difficulty chewing and swallowing, problems with urination, constipation, skin problems, sleep problems are some other symptoms. When you have Parkinson’s disease, the nature of the disease makes you more prone to suffering from mental health disorders like depression. It is important for the care giver to recognize this on time and seek appropriate counselling assistance for the patient.

Living healthy with Parkinson’s disease.

Have you been diagnosed with Parkinson’s disease? Your focus should be on improving your symptoms and maintaining an active and positive lifestyle. There is currently no cure for this disease, however it is possible to successfully manage symptoms through healthy choices, medications, and in select cases medical procedures too. Here are a few health tips to follow:

1. Exercise Regularly

When you have Parkinson’s disease, a regular fitness regime helps give you flexibility, better balance, less anxiety and depression, improved co-ordination and added muscle strength

2. Prevent falls

Balance problems can make falling a real concern when you have Parkinson’s. Here are a few things to keep in mind:

  • Plant your heel first when you take a step
  • Don’t move quickly
  • Work to keep your posture straight as you walk
  • Try not to carry anything when you walk

In spite of these steps if you find yourself falling often consider using a cane or a walker to help you move safely.

3. Sleep well

Sometimes, Parkinson’s can get in the way of a good night’s sleep and may lead to sleep problems. Create a relaxing pre-bedtime routine and follow it every night and maintain your sleep schedule.

4. Eat a healthy diet

It’s common for Parkinson’s disease to cause bone thinning, dehydration, weight loss, and constipation. Here are a few nutrition tips to follow:

  • Eat a variety of whole grains, vegetables, and fruits every day
  • Stay away from saturated and trans fats
  • Limit sugar, salt, and sodium
  • Say “No” to alcohol
  • Stay hydrated
  • Have foods high in vitamin D, magnesium, vitamin K, and calcium for bone strength
  • Take your medications

Being regular with your medicines helps manage the motor symptoms of Parkinson’s disease well.

Parkinson’s treatment at Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital

We understand the impact Parkinson’s disease can have on you and your loved ones. The loss of independence can be frustrating and emotionally draining for patients and carers alike. Our Centre for Neurosciences is committed to therapies that help improve the patient’s quality of life and help them regain the ability to perform their daily activities.

Meet renowned neurologists who are supported by state of the art technology to diagnose, treat and rehabilitate people with Parkinson and Movement Disorders. Our Parkinson’s Clinic offers a comprehensive screening and care program and is equipped with advanced facilities like a gait and balance lab, 3 tesla MRI, surgical suite and intratop MRI, and rehabilitation care.

Our Total Parkinson care program includes:

  • Movement Disorder Specialist Consultation
  • Physiotherapy
  • Speech and swallowing therapy
  • Dietary Counselling
  • Psychology Consultation

The team manages over 7430 Parkinson’s disease patients each year with their unmatched expertise. For further information please visit: https: www.kokilabenhospital.com

Thyroid Disorders

Tuesday, January 12th, 2021

Thyroid diseases are common worldwide and are increasingly affecting people from all age groups. We are sure you know someone in your family or neighbourhood suffering from thyroid. India shares a significant burden of thyroid diseases, with over 42 million thyroid patients. 1 out of 3 Indians suffer from one or the other kind of thyroid disorder that may lead to weight gain and hormonal imbalances.

Functions of the Thyroid Gland
The thyroid gland is a butterfly-shaped organ located in the base of your neck. It is a vital hormone gland and plays a major role in the metabolism, growth, and development of the human body. It helps to regulate many body functions by constantly releasing a steady amount of thyroid hormones into the bloodstream. If the body needs more energy in certain situations – like pregnancy or cold climate, the thyroid gland produces more hormones. Here are the essential body functions that the thyroid controls:

  • Breathing
  • Body weight
  • Heart rate
  • Central and peripheral nervous systems
  • Muscle strength
  • Menstrual cycles
  • Body temperature
  • Cholesterol levels

Common Thyroid Disorders
Normally the thyroid gland produces the exact number of hormones needed to keep your body’s metabolism running and in balance. Thyroid disease occurs when the thyroid fails to function properly, either by releasing too much T4 hormone or by not releasing enough. Here are the most common thyroid disorders:

Hyperthyroidism
In this condition, the thyroid gland is overactive and produces too much of its hormone. Excessive thyroid hormone production leads to symptoms such as:

  • Nervousness and irritability
  • Weight loss
  • Brittle hair and nails
  • Bulging eyes

Hypothyroidism
This is the opposite of hyperthyroidism. The thyroid gland is underactive, and it can’t produce enough of its hormones. Hypothyroidism leads to symptoms such as:

  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Weight gain
  • Depression
  • Memory problems

Hashimoto’s Thyroiditis
This is the most common cause of hypothyroidism. It can occur at any age, but it’s most common in middle-aged women. The disease occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks and slowly destroys the thyroid gland and its ability to produce hormones. The disease can remain stable for years, and symptoms are similar to as of hypothyroidism.

Graves’ Disease
This disease is the most common cause of hyperthyroidism. Graves’ is an autoimmune disorder that occurs when the body’s immune system mistakenly attacks the thyroid gland. This can cause the gland to overproduce the hormone responsible for regulating metabolism. Some of the risk factors include family history, stress, pregnancy, and smoking. The symptoms are common to hyperthyroidism.

Goiter
This is a noncancerous enlargement of the thyroid gland. The most common cause of goiter worldwide is an iodine deficiency in the diet. Goiter can affect anyone at any age, especially in areas of the world where foods rich in iodine are in short supply. The symptoms include:

  • Hoarseness of voice
  • Swelling in your neck
  • Difficulties breathing or swallowing
  • Coughing or wheezing

Thyroid Cancer
Thyroid cancer is a type of cancer that starts in the thyroid gland. Cancer starts when cells begin to grow out of control. It is three times more common in women than in men. The cause of thyroid cancer is unknown, but certain risk factors have been identified and include a family history of goiter, exposure to high levels of radiation, and certain hereditary syndromes. Common symptoms include:

  • A lump around the neck
  • Trouble swallowing
  • Swollen lymph nodes
  • Throat or neck pain

Preventing Thyroid Disorders
Though you may not be able to prevent thyroid disease, you can reduce its risk by following a healthy lifestyle, and avoid complications with early diagnosis and treatment. Here are a few health tips to protect your thyroid health:

  • Be regular with health checkups
  • Stop smoking
  • Exercise regularly
  • Have balanced meals
  • Manage stress better
  • Take a selenium supplement if needed

Concerned about your thyroid disorder? Get exceptional care and treatment with our highly trained endocrinologists. The Department of Endocrinology & Diabetes at Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital offers comprehensive services to diagnose, treat and manage your thyroid disorder. Early diagnosis is the key to prevent the harmful consequences of a thyroid imbalance. Please find below the website link for further details:

https://www.kokilabenhospital.com/departments/clinicaldepartments/endocrinologydiabetes/thyroidclinic.html

Antimicrobial Awareness

Monday, November 23rd, 2020

World Antimicrobial Awareness Week (WAAW) aims to increase the awareness of global antimicrobial resistance (AMR) and to encourage best practices among public and health workers to help reduce the spread of drug-resistant infections. Antimicrobials – including antibiotics, antivirals, antifungals, and antiparasitics – are medicines used to prevent and treat infections in humans, animals, and plants.

What is Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)?
AMR occurs when bacteria, viruses, fungi, and parasites change over time and no longer respond to medicines. This makes infections harder to treat and increase the risk of severe illness and death. This makes medicines ineffective and infections persist in the body, increasing the risk of spread to others. WHO has declared that AMR is one of the top 10 global public health threats facing humanity. It is estimated to cause over 700,000 deaths per year, worldwide.

Dangers of Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)
In addition to death and disability, prolonged illness results in longer hospital stay, leading to increases medical expenses. A growing list of infections – such as pneumonia, tuberculosis, blood poisoning, gonorrhoea, and foodborne diseases – are becoming harder, and sometimes impossible, to treat as antibiotics become less effective. Medical procedures, such as surgery, including caesarean sections or hip replacements, chemotherapy, and organ transplantation, will become riskier due to AMR.

What causes Antimicrobial resistance (AMR)?
The main drivers of antimicrobial resistance include the misuse and overuse of antimicrobials; lack of access to clean water, sanitation, and hygiene (WASH) for both humans and animals; poor infection and disease prevention and control in health-care facilities and farms;  poor access to quality, affordable medicines, vaccines and diagnostics; lack of awareness and knowledge; and lack of enforcement of legislation. The world urgently needs to change the way it prescribes and uses antibiotics. Even if new medicines are developed, without behaviour change, antibiotic resistance will continue to remain a major threat.

How to reduce the spread of Antibiotic Resistance?
Antibiotic-resistant germs can quickly spread across settings, including communities, the food supply, healthcare facilities, the environment (e.g., soil, water), and around the world. Here are some precautions to take to use antibiotics responsibly:

  • Only use antibiotics when prescribed by a doctor
  • Never demand antibiotics if your doctor does not prescribe them
  • Always follow your doctor’s advice when using antibiotics
  • Never share or use leftover antibiotics
  • Prevent infections by regularly washing hands, preparing food hygienically, avoiding close contact with sick people, practising safe sex, and keeping vaccinations up to date.

Myths and facts about Antibiotic Resistance
Myth – It’s the body that becomes resistant to antibiotics
Fact – That is not true, it’s not you but the bacteria within your body that become resistant to antibiotics. Bacteria can even pass this resistance on to each other.

Myth – Antibiotics treat all types of infection
Fact – Antibiotics are only suitable for treating bacterial infections. Other infections, such as those caused by viruses or fungi, will not respond to treatment with antibiotics.

Myth – You must stop taking antibiotics once you feel better
Fact – No. You must complete the entire course of the prescribed antibiotics even if you are feeling better. If treatment stops too soon, the drug may not kill all the bacteria. You may become sick again, and the remaining bacteria may become resistant to the antibiotic that you’ve taken.

Myth – Using antibiotics incorrectly will not cause any major harm
Fact – Overuse and misuse of antibiotics can promote the development of antibiotic-resistant bacteria that can affect the entire world.

Myth – It is okay to share antibiotics
Fact – Never take antibiotics that are leftover from past treatments or given by family or friends. Only take antibiotics prescribed by a doctor. Leftover antibiotics may have expired or may not be correct for your illness.

World Diabetes Day

Friday, November 13th, 2020

Diabetes is a chronic disease, which occurs when the pancreas does not produce enough insulin, or when the body cannot effectively use the insulin it produces. This leads to an increased concentration of glucose in the blood (hyperglycaemia). As per a report by the Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, the prevalence of diabetes in India has been recorded at 11.8%. India is home to an estimated 72.96 million diabetic adults. Also called the diabetes capital of the world, this sugar disease is posing an enormous health challenge for our country. Medical experts suggest that awareness, timely detection, and right management can help patients lead a normal life.

Types of Diabetes

There are mainly three types of diabetes:

  • Type 1 diabetes, also known as juvenile diabetes, is a chronic condition in which the pancreas produces little or no insulin. Certain uncontrollable factors like genetics and some viruses may contribute to type 1 diabetes. Although type 1 diabetes usually appears during childhood or adolescence, it can develop in adults too.
  • Type 2 diabetes is caused by the body’s ineffective use of insulin. It often results from excess body weight and physical inactivity. This is the most common form of diabetes and is largely preventable. 9 in 10 cases of type 2 diabetes could be avoided by following simple lifestyle changes. Uncontrolled type 2 diabetes can lead to chronically high blood glucose levels, causing several symptoms and potentially leading to serious complications.
  • Gestational diabetes is hyperglycaemia that is first recognized during pregnancy. It can lead to serious health risks for both the mother and child and needs close monitoring by a health expert.

Symptoms of Diabetes
The most common symptoms used to identify diabetes include:

  • Increased thirst
  • Frequent urination
  • Excessive hunger
  • Fatigue and weakness
  • Blurred vision
  • Dry mouth

If you see any of the above symptoms, get your blood sugar levels checked or consult a doctor for further assessment.

Diabetes complications
Uncontrolled blood sugar levels may lead to serious long-term problems affecting the eyes, kidneys, heart, brain, feet, and nerves. These include:

  • Eyes – It is recommended that people with diabetes see an eye doctor every year for an eye exam. Eye problems that can occur with diabetes include cataract, glaucoma, retinopathy. Left untreated it may also lead to vision loss.
  • Kidneys – It is important to get your urine tested for protein at least once a year. Protein in the urine is a sign of kidney disease. Prompt treatment may slow the changes with kidney disease.
  • Heart and brain – All people with diabetes have an increased chance of heart disease and strokes. Heart disease is the major cause of death in people with diabetes. It is important to control other risks such as high blood pressure and high fats (cholesterol), as well as blood sugar.
  • Feet – High blood sugar levels can cause skin infections in the foot and leads to slow healing of sores. You can experience severe pain, itching, or experience numbness too. Left untreated, diabetic foot infections may lead to amputation of the toes, foot, or leg.
  • Neuropathy – Diabetic neuropathy is a complication of diabetes that results in damage to the nervous system. It is a progressive disease, and symptoms get worse over time.

Prevention of Type 2 Diabetes

Healthy eating and physical activity could help prevent 90% of Type 2 Diabetes cases. Here is what you can do to reduce your risk of getting type 2 diabetes:

  • Cut sugar and refined carbohydrates
  • Watch your portion size
  • Include fibre in your diet
  • Exercise regularly
  • Drink enough water
  • Quit smoking
  • Sleep well
  • Manage stress levels
  • Be regular with health checkups

Diabetes care at Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital

Worried about your fluctuating blood sugar levels? Obesity and a sedentary lifestyle are the most important risk factors responsible for diabetes. It is possible to reduce the burden of type 2 diabetes by lifestyle changes that favour a healthy diet and regular physical activity. Specialists from our Department of Nutrition Therapy can help you with a personalised diet plan. However, certain medical conditions make weight loss difficult and require further intervention.

The Centre for Diabetes and Obesity is equipped with advanced technology and a talented team of experts to help fight obesity and manage diabetes better. For more information, please visit:

https://www.kokilabenhospital.com/departments/centresofexcellence/centrefor_diabetesbariatricsurgery.html

Stay Healthy and Safe this Diwali

Thursday, November 12th, 2020

One of the most celebrated Indian festivals, Diwali is just around the corner. It symbolizes the spiritual victory of light over darkness, good over evil, and knowledge over ignorance. 2020 has been a challenging year for many people in different ways. It has taught people to be grateful for their health, family, friends, and to never take anything for granted. Everyone is looking forward to the festive and joyous Diwali season to light up a smile and celebrate with family and friends, aren’t you?

Let us welcome Diwali this year with festive cheer and love while ensuring the health and safety of your loved ones. Celebrate responsibly while following the required health precautions. Protect the vulnerable members of your family – the elderly, pregnant women, children below 10 years, and people with co-morbidities.

Here are a few health tips to keep in mind to celebrate a healthy and safe Diwali this year:

  • Avoid large gatherings
    While you might get tempted to organize or attend Diwali dinners with family and friends, it is best to keep the guest list small. It is recommended to celebrate Diwali at home with your family. However, if you are meeting others do not forget to maintain physical distancing, continue the use of face masks and wash your hands frequently with soap and water.
  • Plan virtual celebrations
    Cannot meet your extended family due to health restrictions and travel limitations? Organise a zoom call with your family and friends. Plan a  virtual dinner by deciding a mutual time in advance and dressing up to feel festive. This Diwali, celebrate differently and connect with your loved ones safely.
  • Lamp/ Diya safety
    Make sure you keep the lamps away from curtains, electrical wires, and other inflammable objects. Always keep babies and pets away from diyas. Refrain from using hand sanitizers which are alcohol-based before lighting candles, and diyas. This is because hand sanitizers are inflammable and may cause fire accidents.
  • Boost your immunity
    Have a diet that is rich in fresh fruits and vegetables, whole grains, vitamin C, magnesium, zinc, and omega 3 fatty acids. These nutrients help to strengthen the overall immunity of your body and fight off infections. Stay away from processed foods as they lower your immunity.
  • Stay hydrated 
    Keep your body hydrated by sipping water throughout the day. This helps prevent indigestion and acidity and detoxifies your body. Stay away from aerated drinks, packaged juices, and alcohol as it is dehydrating. Adequate intake of water hydrates your skin and keeps it radiant and glowing for the festive season.
  • Limit your sugar intake
    It is difficult to avoid sweets during this season but you must choose naturally sweetened mithais made from healthy sugar substitutes like dates, jaggery, raisins, honey, etc. This will prevent weight gain, avoid spike in blood sugar levels, and other lifestyle diseases. Relish your Diwali sweets guilt-free.
  • Stay active
    Start your day with some simple exercises like yoga, running, cycling, take the stairs when possible to keep yourself energized and to help maintain your weight. Regular exercise helps boost your immune system.
  • Say “No” to crackers
    The toxic smoke from crackers increases the incidence of respiratory symptoms like cough, wheezing, or burning sensation in the eyes. The increased air pollution poses a high risk for people suffering from asthma, COPD, or other respiratory ailments. Noisy crackers disturb the elderly and infants and may also cause hearing loss or high blood pressure.

Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital wishes you and your family a happy and safe Diwali. We are committed to keeping you and your family safe. Our Accident and Emergency team is available 24/7 for any medical emergencies and provides the fastest response time. Call us on 022 42699999 for emergency services. Please find the below link for our Centre for Accident & Emergency:

https://www.kokilabenhospital.com/departments/centresofexcellence/centrefor_accidentemergency.html