Posts Tagged ‘ Stay healthy ’

Getting back to work safely

Saturday, August 29th, 2020

The future of work looks very different than it did just a few months ago. While some will have to continue to work from home others may have resumed office and this may increase the rate of transmission. Exposure can occur in the workplace while commuting to work or during work-related travel. The employees and the organization both will have to find new efficient ways of working while ensuring everyone’s safety. As businesses reopen in the ‘New Normal’, communication and personal hygiene are more important than ever. Clear policies and messages, training, and constant reminders at the organization are required to increase the awareness of the new safety precautions. Following high levels of personal hygiene is also crucial to fight this pandemic.

Workplace safety protocols to be followed
The implementation of safety protocols will limit the exposure to COVID-19 and will, in turn, reduce the rate of transmission at the workplace. Both employers and employees must take utmost precautions to help reduce the spread of the infection. Here are a few guidelines to follow:

For employees:
Here are a few steps that employees can take to protect themselves and others at work:

  • Wash their hands often with soap and water for at least 20 seconds or to use hand sanitizer with at least 70% alcohol if soap and water are not available.
  • Key times for employees to clean their hands include:
    • Before and after work shifts
    • Before and after work breaks
    • After blowing their nose, coughing, or sneezing
    • After using the restroom
    • Before lunchtime
    • After putting on, touching, or removing cloth face coverings
  • Avoid using other employee’s phones, desks, offices, or other work tools and equipment.
  • Cover their mouth and nose with a tissue when you cough or sneeze, or use the inside of their elbow. Dispose of these tissues safely in a covered dustbin,
  • Stay home if they are sick and seek medical help if required.
  • Avoid sharing your lunch and eat your lunch in your own workspace.
  • Practice social distancing by avoiding large gatherings and maintaining distance (at least 6 feet) from others.

For the employers
Here are a few steps that employers can take to protect themselves and others at work:

  • Practice routine cleaning and disinfection of premises and frequently touched objects and surfaces such as workstations, keyboards, telephones, handrails, and doorknobs.
  • Call the staff to office in staggered shifts to avoid crowding.
  • Use thermal scanners to monitor the temperature at entrance.
  • Ensure regular supply of hand sanitizers(especially at the entrance), soap, and running water in washrooms.
  • Discourage visitors in the office complex unless absolutely necessary.
  • Encourage meetings via video conferencing.
  • Encourage email correspondence instead of physical copies.
  • Facilitate work from home option whenever required.

Healthy living habits for better immune health
A balanced and nutritious diet and healthy lifestyle choices will help reduce your risk of getting COVID-19. Maintaining a healthy diet contributes to high energy levels, improves your brain function, and helps ward off diseases. A strong immunity helps reduce your risk of getting the infection at your workplace or while you travel. Here is a routine that you can follow to help build a strong natural defence system:

Start your day with a healthy breakfast
Including vegetables like carrot, spinach, sweet potatoes, garlic, dark leafy greens, tomato, and broccoli; and fruits like papaya, oranges and other citrus fruits, that contain vitamins A, C, D, and E, and minerals like magnesium, selenium, and zinc to your daily breakfast routine is the first step to build up a strong defence system.

Get good sleep
A human body naturally repairs and recovers, during sleep, from all the wear and tear. Ensure that you get at least 7 to 8 hours of sleep daily.

Stay hydrated
Staying hydrated flushes out all the toxins from the body. Have 8 to 10 glasses of water throughout the day.

Make some time for exercise 
Try exercises like power yoga, skipping, push-ups, jogging on the spot at home.

Practice meditation
A mere 10 minutes of meditation every day can make a big difference. A calm mind helps in better focus and helps strengthen your immunity.

The unlock has begun, the businesses are opening up and the world is getting back to the routine. Make sure you return even stronger and ensure your safety first as you start getting busy in various professional commitments. While attending meetings and finishing other pending tasks do not forget to maintain personal hygiene. Together we can help limit the spread of COVID-19 transmission. Stay safe and healthy as you get back to your workplace.

Healthy you = Healthy nation

Sunday, January 26th, 2020

Are you healthy?

Are you happy?

Is your poor health hampering your professional life?

Chronic diseases and ailments can affect your performance at work, lead to poor concentration and may add to your sick leaves. A good physical and mental health makes an important contribution to the economic progress of the nation. Healthy populations live longer, are more productive, and save more.

India stands to lose $4.58 trillion due to non-communicable diseases and mental disorders between 2012 and 2030, an amount more than double India’s annual GDP, according to a report. Out of this, cardiovascular diseases (CVDs) will account for $2.17 trillion and mental health conditions $1.03 trillion for the majority of the economic loss. This report has been released by the World Economic Forum and the Harvard School of Public Health.

Why is India unhealthy?

Unhealthy diets, physical inactivity, air pollution, harmful use of alcohol and tobacco consumption, lack of awareness is the main reason behind the development of NCDs. A non-communicable disease (NCD) is a disease that is not transmissible directly from one person to another. NCDs include most cancers, heart diseases, Parkinson’s disease, autoimmune diseases, strokes, diabetes, chronic kidney disease, osteoarthritis, osteoporosis, Alzheimer’s disease, cataracts, and others. World Health Organization estimates that an estimated 60 per cent of all deaths in India are due to non-communicable diseases (NCDs).

Top 10 killers in India

The latest Global Burden of Disease study lists ailments that are triggering most deaths and disabilities in India. Here is the list:

1. Heart Disease causes 17.8% of all deaths.

Cases of heart attacks are increasing day by day and an increasing number of cases are affecting younger people.

2. Chronic Obstructive Pulmonary Disease (COPD) causes 8.66% of all deaths.

The human lungs have a holding capacity of 3.5 litres. After 30 years of age, it declines by 10-30 ml per year, if a person does not exercise. However, in COPD patients, it declines faster, almost 100 ml per year which harms the functioning of your lungs. 

3. Diarrhoea causes 7.94% of all deaths.

Diarrhoea kills just a little less than COPD. In all age groups, it is the third-largest killer in India. 

4. Cerebrovascular diseases cause 7.09% of all deaths

This includes neurological diseases like brain strokes and cases of internal bleeding.

5. Cancer causes 6% of all deaths.

According to WHO, India has a cancer mortality rate of 79 per 100,000 deaths and accounts for over 6 percent of total deaths.

6. Lower Respiratory Tract Infections (LRI) cause 5.06% of all deaths.

These include pneumonia and influenza infections. Antibiotics often prove ineffective in today’s drug-resistant strains. This disease strikes the old and young alike.

7. Tuberculosis (TB) causes 4.45% of all deaths.

Cases of Tuberculosis are often misdiagnosed and not treated appropriately which leads to many deaths by TB.

8. Diabetes causes 3.11% of all deaths.

India has an estimated number of 6.5 crore diabetics. Uncontrolled blood sugar leads to many diabetes complications like and may damage your retina, kidneys, nerves, and arteries. A diabetic lives 7-8 years less than a normal person.

9. Chronic Kidney Disease (CKD) causes 2.39% of all deaths.

The reason CKD is such a huge problem is that there is a very high incidence of obesity and hypertension in our country. These are major risk factors for CKD.

10. Suicide causes 2.35% of all deaths.

Of eight lakh suicides across the world annually, 1,35,000 are from India.

Tips to stay healthy 

As we celebrate our 71st Republic day on this 26th January 2020, let us commit to making some healthy lifestyle changes in our life. A healthy population means a healthy country and it goes a long way in contributing to the economic growth of the country. Here are a few tips to maintain optimum health and minimize your risk of diseases:

  1. Quit smoking.
  2. Eat healthy.
  3. Exercise regularly.
  4. Manage your blood sugar levels.
  5. Limit alcohol intake.
  6. Say no to junk food.
  7. Stay hydrated.
  8. Monitor your blood pressure level.
  9. Check your cholesterol levels.
  10. Maintain personal hygiene.

Kokilaben Dhirubhai Ambani Hospital completes 11 years of offering expert medical care in Mumbai on 26th January 2020. We have been ranked no. 1 fourth time in a row as the best multispecialty hospital in Mumbai and western India. We are the only hospital in Mumbai with a Full Time Specialist System (FTSS) ensuring easy availability and access to dedicated specialists. Our hospital is equipped with state of the art infrastructure and world-class technology that helps deliver consistent and safe patient care. Feel free to get in touch with our medical experts for any health-related issues, diagnosis and treatment options. Please find below link of our website for more details: www.kokilabenhospital.com